pipe


pipe
I.
/paɪp / (say puyp)

noun
1. a hollow cylinder of metal, wood, or other material, for the conveyance of water, gas, steam, etc., or for some other purpose; a tube.
2. any of various tubular or cylindrical objects, parts, or formations.
3. a naturally occurring cylindrical cavity in a tree.
4. a tube of wood, clay, hard rubber, or other material, with a small bowl at one end, used for smoking tobacco, opium, crack cocaine, ice, etc.
5. a quantity, as of tobacco, that fills the bowl.
6. Australian History a paper critical of some public figure, rolled into a tube and left in a public place.
7. Music
a. a tube used as, or to form an essential part of, a musical wind instrument.
b. a musical wind instrument consisting of a single tube of straw, reed, wood, or other material, as a flute, clarinet, or oboe.
c. one of the wooden or metal tubes from which the sounds of an organ are produced.
d. (usually plural)bagpipes.
e. (usually plural) a set of flutes, as panpipes.
f. a type of small flute, played with one hand and usually accompanied by a drum which is struck by the other hand (called a tabor).
8. Nautical
a. a boatswain's whistle.
b. the sounding of it as a call.
9. the note or call of a bird, etc.
10. Obsolete the voice, especially as used in singing.
11. a tubular organ or passage in an animal body.
12. (plural) Colloquial the respiratory passages.
13. Mining
a. a cylindrical vein or body of ore.
b. one of the vertical cylindrical masses of bluish rock, of eruption origin, found in southern Africa, in which diamonds are found embedded.
14. Botany the hollow stem of a plant.
15. Computers the keyboard symbol (|); vertical bar.
verb (piped, piping)
verb (i)
16. to play on a pipe.
17. Nautical to announce orders, etc., by a boatswain's pipe or other signal.
18. to speak shrilly.
19. to make or utter a shrill sound like that of a pipe.
20. Mining to carve forming a cylindrical cavity.
21. to form cylindrical or conical holes during moulding, as in casting steel ingots.
verb (t)
22. to convey by means of pipes.
23. to supply with pipes.
24. to play (music) on a pipe or pipes.
25. to summon, order, etc., by sounding the boatswain's pipe or whistle: all hands were piped on deck.
26. to bring, lead, etc., by playing on a pipe.
27. to utter in a shrill tone.
28. to trim or finish (a garment, etc.) with piping.
29. to shape (cream, mashed potatoes, icing, etc.) by forcing through an icing bag and nozzle.
phrase Colloquial
30. pipe down, to become or keep quiet. {Phrase Origin: from nautical signals; ? from the dismissal of a sailor to below decks by being `piped down' by the officer's whistle}
31. pipe up,
a. to begin to talk, especially unexpectedly.
b. to make oneself heard.
c. to speak up, as to assert oneself.
32. put that in your pipe and smoke it!, (an exclamation indicating that an unpleasant ultimatum has been given.)
{Middle English and Old English pīpe, from Vulgar Latin *pīpa, from Latin pīpāre chirp}
II.
/paɪp / (say puyp)

noun
1. a large cask, of varying capacity, for wine, etc.
2. such a cask as a measure of capacity for wine, etc., equal to 4 barrels, 2 hogsheads, or half a tun, and containing 126 wine gallons (105 imperial gallons or 477 litres).
3. such a cask with its contents.
{Old French, ultimately same as pipe1}

Australian English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • pipe — pipe …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • pipe — [ pip ] n. f. • déb. XIIIe; de piper 1 ♦ Vx Pipeau. Chalumeau, tuyau. 2 ♦ Ancienne mesure de capacité. ♢ Région. Grande futaille, de capacité variable. 3 ♦ (XVe; par anal. pop.) Vx …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Pipe — Pipe, n. [AS. p[=i]pe, probably fr. L. pipare, pipire, to chirp; of imitative origin. Cf. {Peep}, {Pibroch}, {Fife}.] 1. A wind instrument of music, consisting of a tube or tubes of straw, reed, wood, or metal; any tube which produces musical… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • pipe — [pīp] n. [ME < OE < WGmc * pipa < VL * pipa < L pipare, to cheep, chirp, peep, of echoic orig.] 1. a hollow cylinder or cone, as of reed, straw, wood, or metal, in which air vibrates to produce a musical sound, as in an organ or wind… …   English World dictionary

  • pipe — ► NOUN 1) a tube used to convey water, gas, oil, etc. 2) a device for smoking tobacco, consisting of a narrow tube that opens into a small bowl in which the tobacco is burned, the smoke being drawn through the tube to the mouth. 3) a wind… …   English terms dictionary

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  • Pipe — Pipe, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piped}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piping}.] 1. To perform, as a tune, by playing on a pipe, flute, fife, etc.; to utter in the shrill tone of a pipe. [1913 Webster] A robin . . . was piping a few querulous notes. W. Irving.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pipe — Pipe, v. i. 1. To play on a pipe, fife, flute, or other tubular wind instrument of music. [1913 Webster] We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced. Matt. xi. 17. [1913 Webster] 2. (Naut.) To call, convey orders, etc., by means of signals on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • PIPE — transaction (PIPE) USA PIPE stands for private investment in public equity. A PIPE transaction is a transaction in which a public company issues equity securities in a private placement to investors (usually at a discount to the market price of… …   Law dictionary


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